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  1. Silent Hunters

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    When World War II erupted across Europe in 1939, Germany knew it could not hope to compete with t...

    When World War II erupted across Europe in 1939, Germany knew it could not hope to compete with the Royal Navy in a head-to-head naval war. Left with no viable alternatives, the U-Bootwaffe wagered everything on the submarine in a desperate attempt to sink more tonnage than the Allies could construct. Some of these "e;silent hunters"e; who slipped out of their shelters along Europe's shores to stalk their prey have enjoyed considerable recognition in the years since. While most aspects of the bitter struggle have been told and retold from both the Axis and Allied points of view, the careers of some highly effective U-boat commanders have languished in undeserved obscurity. The profiles of six such commanders are presented in this collection of essays. They include Englebert Endrass, whose spectacular career before being lost off the coast of Gibraltar is described here by his best friend and fellow ace Enrich Topp, who wrote this while on his 15th War Patrol; Karl-Friedrich Merten, who was ranked among the war's top tonnage aces; Ralph Kapitsky, whose U-615 suicidal surface-to-air battle in the Caribbean allowed many of his fellow submariners to escape into the Atlantic; Fritz Guggenberger, who sank an aircraft carrier and organized the biggest POW escape attempt in American history; Victor Oehrn, a former staff officer of Karl Doenitz's; and Heinz Eck, who was executed by the British.
  2. Encircling the Union Army

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    Jeb Stuart's bold and unauthorized ride around the enemy in June 1862 is still studied and celebr...

    Jeb Stuart's bold and unauthorized ride around the enemy in June 1862 is still studied and celebrated as one of history's most daring intelligence raids. By late May 1862, Gen. George B. McClellan had moved his massive Army of the Potomac to the outskirts of the Confederate capital at Richmond. When Confederate Gen. Joseph Johnston fell wounded at Seven Pines on May 31, Gen. Robert E. Lee assumed command of the Army of Northern Virginia and turned the tide of war in the Eastern Theater. Lee ordered his dashing cavalry leader Jeb Stuart and 1,200 troopers to find the position of McClellan's right flank. The cavalryman easily discovered the Union flank but continued riding around the enemy in a daring display far exceeding Lee's intention. The gray-clad mounted troops harassed supply lines and captured enemy troops while covering some 100 miles pursued by Union cavalry led by Stuart's father-in-law, Gen. Philip St. George Cooke. Stuart's expedition ended when he returned toRichmond on June 15 with invaluable information that helped General Lee finalize plans for a major offensive operation that triggered the Seven Days' Battles and eventually defeated and drove McClellan and his army away from Richmond.Original photos, illustrations, and maps
  3. Imboden's Brigade in the Gettysburg Campaign

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    John Daniel Imboden carved out one of the most unique and fascinating careers of the Civil War. I...

    John Daniel Imboden carved out one of the most unique and fascinating careers of the Civil War. In 1859, the lawyer and politician was commissioned a captain in the Staunton (Va.) Artillery. When war broke out in 1861, he served with his battery at Harpers Ferry and First Manassas. In 1862, Imboden raised the 1st Virginia Partisan Rangers and fought in Stonewall Jackson's famed Shenandoah Valley Campaign. A promotion to brigadier general followed in early 1863, as did daring cavalry raids. Imboden served until the end of the war, but it was his service during the Gettysburg Campaign for which he is best remembered. Steve French's Imboden's Brigade in the Gettysburg Campaign, the winner of the 2008 Bachelder-Coddington Award, the Gettysburg Civil War Round Table Book Award, and the Jefferson Davis Historical Gold Medal, is the first full-length book to tell the story of the general's "e;finest hour."e;The brigadier and his 1400-man Northwestern Virginia brigade, which included artillery, infantry and cavalry, spent most of the early days of the campaign raiding along the B&O Railroad in western Virginia, before guarding ammunition and supply trains in the rear of Lee's Army of Northern Virginia during the three-day (July 1-3, 1863) Battle of Gettysburg. The sharp Confederate defeat forced a hasty retreat , and Lee put Imboden in charge of escorting the wagons filled with thousands of wounded safely back to Virginia. After a harrowing journey beset by heavy rain and attacks by roving bands of Union cavalry, Imboden's seventeen-mile-long "e;wagon train of misery"e; finally reached Williamsport, Maryland, where the flooding Potomac River trapped them. On July 5-6, Imboden established a strong defensive position on a ridge outside of town and cobbled together a force of soldiers that included his own brigade, various Confederate units on their way to join the army, 600 teamsters, many walking wounded and over twenty cannons. Demonstrating sound judgment and outstanding bravery, this hastily organized force beat back attacks by two Union cavalry divisions in the "e;Wagoners Fight."e; Imboden's efforts saved the wagon train and thousands of men who would otherwise have been captured or killed. General Lee praised Imboden and reported that he "e;gallantly repulsed"e; the enemy troopers.French's Imboden's Brigade in the Gettysburg Campaign is based on scores of archival sources, newspaper accounts, and an excellent understanding of the terrain. The dozens of maps, photos, and illustrations, coupled with French's smooth prose, tells in riveting detail the full story of the often forgotten but absolutely critical role Imboden and his men played during the final fateful days of the Gettysburg Campaign.
  4. Peninsula Campaign of 1862

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    The first of three volumes. The Civil War's Peninsula Campaign (March through July 1862) was the ...

    The first of three volumes. The Civil War's Peninsula Campaign (March through July 1862) was the first large-scale Union operation in Virginia to capture the Confederate capital at Richmond. The operation was organized and led by Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan, whose amphibious turning operation was initially successful in landing troops at the tip of the Virginia peninsula against the cautious Confederate Gen. Joseph E. Johnston. When Johnston was wounded at Seven Pines at the end of May outside Richmond, however, Gen. Robert E. Lee was elevated to command the Army of Northern Virginia. His subsequent major offensive to defeat The Army of the Potomac during the Seven Days' Battles turned the tide of the campaign and the entire momentum of the war in the Eastern Theater. Original well-researched and written essays by leading scholars in the field on a wide variety of fascinating topics. Contains original maps, photos, and illustrations.
  5. Nothing Friendly in the Vicinity ...

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    As chronicled in Silent Victory, Clay Blair's monumental history of United States submarine opera...

    As chronicled in Silent Victory, Clay Blair's monumental history of United States submarine operations in World War II, the submarine war against Japan was a relatively little known war-within-a-war. It was waged by an initially small but expanding force of boats that eventually made more than 1,400 war patrols and sank almost 1,400 Japanese merchant ships and naval vessels. Many American submarines carved out enviable records, including USS Guardfish, the subject of Claude Conner's remarkable memoir of service aboard a US fleet boat as an enlisted man. Conner, who served as a Radar Technician, weaves a compelling tale of his service during several war patrols in the Pacific Theater against the Japanese. His firsthand account spans the spectrum in detail and emotion, describing everything from humorous personal incidents to the boat's bone crushing battle against the sea; the thrill of sending an enemy ship, to the bottom of the deathly terror of being trapped in a flooding conning tower. A significant portion of Conner's reminiscence describes the friendly-fire sinking of USS Extractor, which came about when Guardfish's skipper mistook the ship for a Japanese submarine. Along with the tragic sinking, Conner offers important information about Extractor and her crew, several detailed firsthand recollections of survivors, and an engrossing account of the Court of Inquiry that followed and for which Conner testified as a witness. Nothing Friendly in the Vicinity is a fresh and compelling account of an enlisted man's experiences during the hellish submarine war against Japan, and recognized today as a classic of the genre.
  6. Campaign For Atlanta & Sherman's March to the Sea, Volume 1

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    The first of two volumes. The Atlanta Campaign (May - September 1864) consisted of wide-ranging m...

    The first of two volumes. The Atlanta Campaign (May - September 1864) consisted of wide-ranging maneuvers and a series of battles North Georgia during the Civil War with the intent to capture the important city of Atlanta. Union Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman launched his three-army invasion from Chattanooga, Tennessee, in early May 1864, opposed by Confederate Gen. Joseph E. Johnston's Army of Tennessee. The Confederates fell back toward Atlanta in a series of withdrawals after Sherman's successive flanking maneuvers. Johnston was replaced by the more aggressive Gen. John Bell Hood in mid-July, who turned to a series of attacks to throw back and defeat Sherman on Atlanta's doorstep. The Army of Tennessee was besieged in the city that August and the city fell on September 2.Original well-researched and written essays by leading scholars in the field on a wide variety of fascinating topics. Contains original maps, photos, and illustrations.
  7. Peninsula Campaign of 1862

    Ebook
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    The second of three volumes. The Civil War's Peninsula Campaign (March through July 1862) was the...

    The second of three volumes. The Civil War's Peninsula Campaign (March through July 1862) was the first large-scale Union operation in Virginia to capture the Confederate capital at Richmond. The operation was organized and led by Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan, whose amphibious turning operation was initially successful in landing troops at the tip of the Virginia peninsula against the cautious Confederate Gen. Joseph E. Johnston. When Johnston was wounded at Seven Pines at the end of May outside Richmond, however, Gen. Robert E. Lee was elevated to command the Army of Northern Virginia. His subsequent major offensive to defeat The Army of the Potomac during the Seven Days' Battles turned the tide of the campaign and the entire momentum of the war in the Eastern Theater. Original well-researched and written essays by leading scholars in the field on a wide variety of fascinating topics. Contains original maps, photos, and illustrations.
  8. Leadership and Command in the American Civil War

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    Leadership and Command is a unique collection of five carefully-crafted essays by leading scholar...

    Leadership and Command is a unique collection of five carefully-crafted essays by leading scholars, each dealing with an important and understudied slice of history from the epic events of 1861-1865. Georgia historian Richard McMurry inaugurates this compendium by directing the bright spotlight of scrutiny upon Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston's early-war tenure of command in the Eastern Theater of operations. It was in Virginia, asserts McMurry, that the seeds of several Southern disasters were initially sown.Economist Edward Carr Franks examines Western Theater issues of strategy by challenging long-held assumptions about Braxton Bragg's controversial decision to detach an entire corps of his army under James Longstreet on a mission to capture Knoxville. Franks argues that this division of force in the face of the enemy was not responsible for the crippling defeat that followed at Missionary Ridge a few weeks later.Retired Army officer Marion V. Armstrong reexamines the controversial command decisions made by Federal II Corps commander Maj. Gen. Edwin V. Sumner at Antietam, that led to the slaughter of one of his divisions in the West Woods and a series of bitter recriminations that echo to this day.Although George E. Pickett's name will forever be associated with the glory inherent in the assault on the third day at Gettysburg, his record as a general during the war's final years is replete with defeat, shocking lapses of command, mental breakdowns, and a deadly controversy. Historian Lesley J. Gordon critically examines Pickett's virtually unknown career after Gettysburg, which almost earned him a date with a Federal war crimes tribunal.Steven E. Woodworth completes this collection with an insightful assessment of Gen. Pierre G. T. Beauregard's battlefield performance in the Bermuda Hundred Campaign. Was it, as his defenders have claimed, a masterful display of generalship, or simply another example that the Louisiana general was unfit for field command?
  9. "e;By the Blood of Our Alumni"e;

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    Norwich University, the nation's oldest private military college, graduated hundreds of officers ...

    Norwich University, the nation's oldest private military college, graduated hundreds of officers into the Federal armies who participated in the long and bloody war to crush the Southern Rebellion of 1861-1865. Robert Poirier's "e;By the Blood of Our Alumni"e;: Norwich University Citizen Soldiers in the Army of the Potomac is their story.It is difficult to overstate the school's influence on the war in the Eastern Theater. Norwich alumni were scattered throughout the army's hierarchy. In the Army of the Potomac alone, 1 graduate led a corps, 7 led divisions, 21 commanded brigades, and 38 stood at the heads of regiments. Scores more served in staff positions or in the ranks. These men-citizen-soldiers steeped in our country's finest traditions-were eyewitnesses to many of the war's watershed events. In addition to training thousands of volunteers in the art of war, these officers played a significant role in turning back General Lee's Army of Northern Virginia at Antietam; defeating Lee at Gettysburg; bleeding his army during the Overland Campaign and in Petersburg's trenches; and finally forcing his surrender at Appomattox. Norwich alumni served proudly in every battle of the Army of the Potomac.Unfortunately, historians have largely overlooked the important role Norwich played in both preparing our nation for conflict and in winning the Civil War. Robert G. Poirier, a retired intelligence officer, Norwich alumnus, and combat veteran, has spent years researching and writing "e;By the Blood of Our Alumni."e; His book narrates the course of the war in the Eastern Theater by chronicling the experiences of these soldiers. Wherever possible, Poirier allows the veterans to speak for themselves, weaving their recollections and observations into a seamless history that will please everyone from the hardcore academic to the general reader."e;By the Blood of our Alumni"e; restores this venerable institution to its proper place in American military history.
  10. For Cause and Country

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    The battles at Spring Hill and Franklin, Tennessee, in the late autumn of 1864 were watershed mom...

    The battles at Spring Hill and Franklin, Tennessee, in the late autumn of 1864 were watershed moments in the American Civil War. Thousands of hardened veterans and a number of recruits, as well as former West Point classmates, found themselves moving through Middle Tennessee in the last great campaign of a long and bitter war. Replete with bravery, dedication, bloodshed, and controversy, these battles led directly to the conclusion of action in the Western Theater. Spring Hill and Franklin, which were once long ignored and seldom understood, have slowly been regaining their place on the national stage. They remain one of the most compelling episodes of the Civil War. Through exhaustive research and the use of sources never before published, the stories of both battles comes vividly to life in For Cause & For Country. Over 100 pages of material have been added to this new edition, including new maps and photos. The genesis and early stages of the Tennessee Campaign play out in clear and readable fashion. The lost opportunity at Spring Hill is evaluated in great detail, and the truth of what happened there is finally shown based on evidence rather than conjecture. The intricate dynamics of the Confederate high command, and especially the roles of General John Bell Hood and General Frank Cheatham, are given special attention.The horrific battle at Franklin is told like never before. From what truly motivated John Bell Hood to launch such a desperate attack, to the vital role of Federal units either forgotten or ignored, the reader will see the confrontation portrayed in an entirely new light. Events such as the Confederate assault on the Federal left flank, the actions of the Confederate Missouri Brigade, General John Adams' death, General William Bate's attack, and how the Federal army emerged victorious, are given the thorough examination they have so long been denied.For Cause & For Country offers a balanced and richly detailed study of the battles that helped to decide the outcome of the Civil War. Students of Spring Hill and Franklin will appreciate the abundance of new information which will show that the battles had a far greater scope and importance than many previously realized. Those not familiar with the story will find themselves drawn to the incredible events of late 1864, when Middle Tennessee stood center stage as the divided nation defined and repaired itself through blood and fire.
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