89,99 €*
The Geology of Stratigraphic Sequences

The Geology of Stratigraphic Sequences

 Previously published in hardcover
Sf Besorgungstitel | Versandkostenfrei
This book situates sequences within the broader context of geological processes so that geoscientists are equipped to extract the maximum information from the record of sequences in a given basin or region. It is essential reading for professional geologists.
99
Contents
Part I

THE EMERGENCE OF MODERN CONCEPTS

1 HISTORICAL AND METHODOLOGICAL BACKGROUND

1.1 introduction

1.2 Methodologies in geology

1.2.2 The significance of sequence stratigraphy

1.2.3 Data and argument in Geology

1.2.4 The hermeneutic circle and the emergence of sequence stratigraphy

1.2.5 Paradigms and exemplars

1.3 The development of descriptive stratigraphy

1.3.1 The growth of modern concepts

1.3.2 Do stratigraphic units have "time" significance?

1.3.3 The development of modern chronostratigraphy

1.4 The continual search for a "pulse of the earth"1.5 Problems and research trends: the current status

1.6 Current literature

1.7 Stratigraphic terminology

2 THE BASIC SEQUENCE MODEL

2.1 Introduction

2.2 Elements of the model

2.2.1 Accommodation and supply

2.2.2 Stratigraphic architecture

2.2.3 Depositional systems and systems tracts

2.3 Sequence models in clastic and carbonate settings

2.3.1 Marine clastic depositional systems and systems tracts

2.3.2 Nonmarine depositional systems

2.3.3 Carbonate depositional systems

2.3.3.1 Breaks in sedimentation in carbonate environments

2.3.3.2 Platform carbonates: catch-up versus keep-up

2.4 Sequence definitions

Figures

3 OTHER METHODS FOR THE STRATIGRAPHIC ANALYSIS OF CYCLES OF BASE-LEVEL CHANGE

3.1 Introduction

3.2 Facies cycles

3.3 Areas and volumes of stratigraphic units

3.4 Hypsometric curves

3.5 Backstripping

3.6 Sea-level estimation from paleoshorelines and other fixed points

3.7 Documentation of metre-scale cycles

3.8 Integrated tectonic-stratigraphic analysis

Figures

Part II

THE STRATIGRAPHIC FRAMEWORK

4 The major types of stratigraphic cycle

4.1 Introduction

4.2 Sequence hierarchy

4.3 The supercontinent cycle

4.4 Cycles with episodicities of tens of millions of years

4.5 Cycles with million-year episodicities

4.6 Cycles with episodicities of less than one million years

Tables

Figures

5 CYCLES WITH EPISODICITIES OF TENS TO HUNDREDS OF MILLIONS OF YEARS

5.1 Climate, sedimentation and biogenesis

5.2 The supercontinent cycle

5.2.1 The tectonic-stratigraphic model

5.2.2 The Phanerozoic record

5.3 Cycles with episodicities of tens of millions of years

5.3.1 Regional to intercontinental correlations

5.3.2 Tectonostratigraphic sequences

5.4 Main conclusions

Figures

6 CYCLES WITH MILLION-YEAR EPISODICITIES

6.1 Continental margins

6.1.1 Clastic platforms and margins

6.1.2 Carbonate cycles of platforms and craton margins

6.1.3 Mixed carbonate-clastic successions

6.2 Foreland basins

6.2.1 Foreland basin of the North American Western Interior

6.2.2 Other foreland basins

6.3 Arc-related basins

6.3.1 Forearc basins

6.3.2 Backarc basins

6.4 Cyclothems and mesothems

6.6 Conclusions

Figures

7 CYCLES WITH EPISODICITIES OF LESS THAN ONE MILLION YEARS

7.1 Introduction

7.2 Neogene clastic cycles of continental margins

7.2.1 The Gulf Coast basin of the United States

7.2.2 Wanganui Basin, North Island, New Zealand

7.2.3 Other examples of Neogene high-frequency cycles

7.2.4 The deep-marine record

7.3 Pre-Neogene marine carbonate and clastic cycles

7.4 Late Paleozoic cyclothems

7.5 Lacustrine clastic and chemical rhythms

7.6 High-frequency cycles in foreland basins

7.7 Main conclusions

Figures

Part III

MECHANISMS

8 SUMMARY OF SEQUENCE-GENERATING MECHANISMS

Figures

9 LONG-TERM EUSTASY AND EPEIROGENY

9.1 Mantle processes and dynamic topography

9.2 Supercontinent cycles

9.3 Cycles with episodicities of tens of millions of years9.3.1 Eustasy

9.3.2 Dynamic topography and epeirogeny

9.3.3 The origin of Sloss sequences

9.4 Main conclusions

Figures

10 TECTONIC MECHANISMS

10.1 Introduction

10.2 Rifting and thermal evolution of divergent plate margins

10.2.1 Basic geophysical models and their implicati Contents

Part I

THE EMERGENCE OF MODERN CONCEPTS

1 HISTORICAL AND METHODOLOGICAL BACKGROUND

1.1 introduction

1.2 Methodologies in geology

1.2.2 The significance of sequence stratigraphy

1.2.3 Data and argument in Geology

1.2.4 The hermeneutic circle and the emergence of sequence stratigraphy

1.2.5 Paradigms and exemplars

1.3 The development of descriptive stratigraphy

1.3.1 The growth of modern concepts

1.3.2 Do stratigraphic units have "time" significance?

1.3.3 The development of modern chronostratigraphy

1.4 The continual search for a "pulse of the earth"

1.5 Problems and research trends: the current status

1.6 Current literature

1.7 Stratigraphic terminology

2 THE BASIC SEQUENCE MODEL

2.1 Introduction

2.2 Elements of the model

2.2.1 Accommodation and supply

2.2.2 Stratigraphic architecture

2.2.3 Depositional systems and systems tracts

2.3 Sequence models in clastic and carbonate settings

2.3.1 Marine clastic depositional systems and systems tracts

2.3.2 Nonmarine depositional systems

2.3.3 Carbonate depositional systems

2.3.3.1 Breaks in sedimentation in carbonate environments

2.3.3.2 Platform carbonates: catch-up versus keep-up

2.4 Sequence definitions

Figures

3 OTHER METHODS FOR THE STRATIGRAPHIC ANALYSIS OF CYCLES OF BASE-LEVEL CHANGE

3.1 Introduction

3.2 Facies cycles

3.3 Areas and volumes of stratigraphic units

3.4 Hypsometric curves

3.5 Backstripping

3.6 Sea-level estimation from paleoshorelines and other fixed points

3.7 Documentation of metre-scale cycles

3.8 Integrated tectonic-stratigraphic analysis

Figures

Part II

THE STRATIGRAPHIC FRAMEWORK

4 The major types of stratigraphic cycle

4.1 Introduction

4.2 Sequence hierarchy

4.3 The supercontinent cycle

4.4 Cycles with episodicities of tens of millions of years

4.5 Cycles with million-year episodicities

4.6 Cycles with episodicities of less than one million years

Tables

Figures

5 CYCLES WITH EPISODICITIES OF TENS TO HUNDREDS OF MILLIONS OF YEARS

5.1 Climate, sedimentation and biogenesis

5.2 The supercontinent cycle

5.2.1 The tectonic-stratigraphic model

5.2.2 The Phanerozoic record

5.3 Cycles with episodicities of tens of millions of years

5.3.1 Regional to intercontinental correlations

5.3.2 Tectonostratigraphic sequences

5.4 Main conclusions

Figures

6 CYCLES WITH MILLION-YEAR EPISODICITIES

6.1 Continental margins

6.1.1 Clastic platforms and margins

6.1.2 Carbonate cycles of platforms and craton margins

6.1.3 Mixed carbonate-clastic successions

6.2 Foreland basins

6.2.1 Foreland basin of the North American Western Interior

6.2.2 Other foreland basins

6.3 Arc-related basins

6.3.1 Forearc basins

6.3.2 Backarc basins

6.4 Cyclothems and mesothems

6.6 Conclusions

Figures

7 CYCLES WITH EPISODICITIES OF LESS THAN ONE MILLION YEARS

7.1 Introduction

7.2 Neogene clastic cycles of continental margins

7.2.1 The Gulf Coast basin of the United States

7.2.2 Wanganui Basin, North Island, New Zealand

7.2.3 Other examples of Neogene high-frequency cycles

7.2.4 The deep-marine record

7.3 Pre-Neogene marine carbonate and clastic cycles

7.4 Late Paleozoic cyclothems

7.5 Lacustrine clastic and chemical rhythms

7.6 High-frequency cycles in foreland basins

7.7 Main conclusions

Figures

Part III

MECHANISMS

8 SUMMARY OF SEQUENCE-GENERATING MECHANISMS

Figures

9 LONG-TERM EUSTASY AND EPEIROGENY

9.1 Mantle processes and dynamic topography

9.2 Supercontinent cycles

9.3 Cycles with episodicities of tens of millions of years

9.3.1 Eustasy

9.3.2 Dynamic topography and epeirogeny

9.3.3 The origin of Sloss sequences

9.4 Main conclusions

Figures

10 TECTONIC MECHANISMS

10.1 Introduction

10.2 Rifting and thermal evolution of divergent plate margins

10.2.1 Basic geophysical models and their i
It has been more than a decade since the appearance of the First Edition of this book. Much progress has been made, but some controversies remain. The original ideas of Sloss and of Vail (building on the early work of Blackwelder, Grabau, Ulrich, Levorsen and others) that the stratigraphic record could be subdivided into sequences, and that these sequences store essential information about basin-forming and subsidence processes, remains as powerful an idea as when it was first formulated. The definition and mapping of sequences has become a standard part of the basin analysis process. The main purpose of this book remains the same as it was for the first edition, that is, to situate sequences within the broader context of geological processes, and to answer the question: why do sequences form? Geoscientists might thereby be better equipped to extract the maximum information from the record of sequences in a given basin or region. Tectonic, climatic and other mechanisms are the generating mechanisms for sequences ranging over a wide range of times scales, from hundreds of millions of years to the high-frequency sequences formed by cyclic processes lasting a few tens of thousands of years

Mehr zum Thema

    Chronostratigraphy; Forearc; Neogen; Sediment; Sedimentation; Stratigraphy; lacustrine

Produktdetails

Autor: Andrew D. Miall
ISBN-13: 9783642423062
ISBN: 364242306X
Einband: Previously published in hardcover
Seiten: 544
Gewicht: 1112 g
Format: 259x195x32 mm
Sprache: Englisch

Zu diesem Artikel ist noch keine Rezension vorhanden.
Helfen sie anderen Besuchern und verfassen Sie selbst eine Rezension.

 

Rezensionen

Autor: Andrew D. Miall
ISBN-13:: 9783642423062
ISBN: 364242306X
Erscheinungsjahr: 31.10.2014
Verlag: Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Gewicht: 1112g
Seiten: 544
Sprache: Englisch
Auflage 14002, 2nd ed. 2010
Sonstiges: Taschenbuch, 259x195x32 mm