Yizkor Book of Ostrow Mazowiecka (Number 2)
-12 %

Yizkor Book of Ostrow Mazowiecka (Number 2)

Translation of Ostrow Mazowiecka
 HC gerader Rücken kaschiert
Sofort lieferbar| Lieferzeit:3-5 Tage I

Unser bisheriger Preis:ORGPRICE: 50,70 €

Jetzt 44,62 €*

Alle Preise inkl. MwSt. | ggf. zzgl. Versand
ISBN-13:
9781939561510
Einband:
HC gerader Rücken kaschiert
Erscheinungsdatum:
24.06.2017
Seiten:
394
Autor:
Yehuda Leib Levin
Gewicht:
1261 g
Format:
287x220x30 mm
Sprache:
Englisch
Beschreibung:
Yizkor Book of Ostrow Mazowiecka (No. 2)This memorial book, written by a survivor, tells the fascinating story of the Jewish community of the town of Ostrow Mazowiecka (called Ostroveh by Jews), Poland, from its inception in the mid-1700s until its destruction in the Holocaust. It tells the story of conflict and compromise, early on between Hassidim and Mitnagdim, and later between traditionalists and modernists (Zionists, socialists, etc.), and between Jews and non-Jews, during tumultuous historic events: the partition of Poland in the late 18th century; tsarist oppression and pogroms in the 19th; war and occupation by both Russians and Germans in both World Wars and the occupation, escape to Russia by some Jews, and final extermination of the remaining Jews by the Nazis in World War II.
The book also discusses schools, yeshivot, charities, political parties, leading rabbis and lay leaders. Translated from Hebrew and edited by a descendant of one of the town's oldest families, it also contains additional new material (photographs, maps, and explanatory footnotes) that provides a broader picture of this once prominent Jewish community.

Yizkor Book of Ostrow Mazowiecka (No. 2)
This memorial book, written by a survivor, tells the fascinating story of the Jewish community of the town of Ostrow Mazowiecka (called Ostroveh by Jews), Poland, from its inception in the mid-1700s until its destruction in the Holocaust. It tells the story of conflict and compromise, early on between Hassidim and Mitnagdim, and later between traditionalists and modernists (Zionists, socialists, etc.), and between Jews and non-Jews, during tumultuous historic events: the partition of Poland in the late 18th century; tsarist oppression and pogroms in the 19th; war and occupation by both Russians and Germans in both World Wars and the occupation, escape to Russia by some Jews, and final extermination of the remaining Jews by the Nazis in World War II.
The book also discusses schools, yeshivot, charities, political parties, leading rabbis and lay leaders. Translated from Hebrew and edited by a descendant of one of the town's oldest families, it also contains additional new material (photographs, maps, and explanatory footnotes) that provides a broader picture of this once prominent Jewish community.