Masculinities in American Western Films

A Hyper-Linear History
 Taschenbuch
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ISBN-13:
9781906165604
Einband:
Taschenbuch
Erscheinungsdatum:
30.08.2016
Seiten:
280
Autor:
Emma Hamilton
Gewicht:
415 g
Format:
223x152x20 mm
Sprache:
Englisch
Beschreibung:
The "Western" embodies many of the stereotypes of masculinity: rugged, independent men in cowboy hats roam the barren landscapes of the American West. Where did these cowboys come from? This book explores the relationship between the Western, film and historical representation and the ways in which masculine gender performance is itself historical.
Contents: Gender, History and the West - "He's not a man! He's a sack of money!": Corporatism and the Male Breadwinner - "Back home they think I'm very strange. I'm a feminist": Re-Evaluating the Feminine Other - "You're the party done all the suffering": Representing Stereotypes of Native Americans in the "Pro-Indian" Western Cycle - "A pistol don't make a man": Technology and Masculine Gender Performances - "Who are those guys?": Understanding American Intervention in the "South of the Border" Western - "As unmarked as their place in history": Black Westerns, an Alternative History of Masculinities?
The "Western" embodies many of the stereotypes of masculinity: rugged, independent men in cowboy hats roam the barren landscapes of the American West, resolving conflicts with guns and tough talk. Where did these cowboys come from? What historical trends led to their emergence on screen?
This book explores the relationship between the Western, film and historical representation and the ways in which masculine gender performance is itself historical. It posits a new interpretation of how history functions on film, termed hyper-linear history. Hyper-linear history creates the possibility of seeing film as a vehicle that makes the past immediately explicit and relevant, rendering historical understandings complex.

The study offers a fresh exploration of American Western films made in the 1950s and 1960s, arguing that many Westerns of this period rely on the post-Civil War on-screen past to make sense of the tumultuous experiences of the period, to various effect. The films especially tap into the ways in which national economic, political, technological and social changes impact the performance of hegemonic masculinities. These films provide insight into the ways in which masculinities are performed and gender crises are expressed, explored and resolved.