Lights in the Sky: Identifying and Understanding Astronomical and Meteorological Phenomena
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Lights in the Sky: Identifying and Understanding Astronomical and Meteorological Phenomena

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ISBN-13:
9781846285622
Einband:
Taschenbuch
Erscheinungsdatum:
01.11.2007
Seiten:
226
Autor:
Michael Maunder
Gewicht:
540 g
Format:
234x160x14 mm
Serie:
Patrick Moore's Practical Astr
Sprache:
Englisch
Beschreibung:

Many lights and objects in the sky are misunderstood, and often completely unrecognised by observers. These range from rainbows and meteors, to the unusual: green flash and ball lightning. Many are classed as "UFOs," a description which has long connoted mysterious, extraterrestrial visitors. The first part of this book is an identification guide offering quick and structured clues to known day or nighttime aerial phenomena. Objects thus found are referenced to the second part of the book, which gives a full description, physical explanation, and relevant notes on observing and photographing various phenomena. Some require optical aids such as binoculars or telescopes, but the main thrust of the book is identification and explanation rather than imaging. The final chapter approaches UFOs from a scientific standpoint, with a short section on "extraterrestrial UFOs," emphasising burden of proof and touching on scientific theories of life on other worlds, and the improbability of visitors.
PART 1 - IDENTIFIER
Daylight
Diffuse phenomena
Point Sources
Dawn and Dusk
Diffuse phenomena
Point Sources
Night
Diffuse phenomena
Point Sources
PART 2 - ASTRONOMICAL AND METEOROLOGICAL PHENOMENA
Dawn: Zodiacal light Season for pre-dawn sighting
Red sky, Shepherd's warning
Crepuscular rays
Other dawn phenomena
Daylight: Haloes and coronas also detached arcs
Sundogs and mock suns (a special case of a halo)
Iridescence
Glories
Heiligenschein
Rainbows & fogbows
Dusk: Zodiacal light Season for twilight sightings
Red sky Shepherd's delight
Solar pillars
Green flash
Spectre of the Brocken
Mother of pearl clouds
Volcanic dust ( Krakatoa 1888, via El Chicon 1981 to Pinatubo 1990)
Other dust:
Bishop's ring, green & blue suns
Night: Light pollution
Milky Way
Messier objects
Caldwell objects
Gegenschein
Lunar haloes
Lunar rainbows
Aurorae
Nacreous clouds
Noctilucent clouds
Meteors
Other phenomena: marsh gas, fireflies &c
Anytime: Lightning,
Ball lightning
UFOs: Human perception
Mistaken identities
Astronomical and meteorological
Man-made
Extraterrestrial visitors?
Burden of proof
The Fermi paradox
Further Reading
Many lights and other objects in the sky go unrecognised, or at least are little understood by those observing them. Such things range from the commonplace like rainbows and meteors, to the distinctly unusual like the green flash and ball lightning. And there is still a residuum of objects that remain unidentified by the watcher - classed generally as 'UFOs', a description which today has connotations of the mysterious, even of extraterrestrial visitors.
The first part of this book is an identification guide, very much like the "plant identifier" sections found in a good gardening or botany book. It allows quick (and structured) identification of known aerial phenomena, whether at night or during the day. The objects thus found are referenced to the second part of the book...

The second part gives a full description, physical explanation, and where relevant notes on observing and photographing the various phenomena. Some will need optical aids such as binoculars or telescopes, but the main thrust of the book is identification and explanation rather than imaging.

The final chapter approaches UFOs from a scientific standpoint, particularly the way in which human perception and often preconception affects the outcome. It does however finish with a short section on "extraterrestrial UFOs", emphasising the burden of proof aspect and touching on the scientific theories of life on other worlds and the improbability of visitors.