Industrial Competitiveness: Cost Reduction
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Industrial Competitiveness: Cost Reduction

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ISBN-13:
9781402043116
Einband:
Buch
Erscheinungsdatum:
01.03.2006
Seiten:
200
Autor:
Gideon Halevi
Gewicht:
526 g
Format:
241x165x14 mm
Sprache:
Englisch
Beschreibung:

Uses the form of a dialogue between middle and higher management of a production plant aimed at finding ways to optimize company profit and to reduce manufacturing costs
PREFACE; PART ONE - REDUCE INVENTORY COST: CHAPTER 1 - SHOP FLOOR COST REDUCTION: INTRODUCTION; CHAPTER 2 - INTRODUCTION TO INVENTORY: THE PURPOSE OF INVENTORY; INVENTORY OBJECTIVE; CHAPTER 3 - RAW MATERIAL REDUCTION SESSION: WHY RAW MATERIAL; ELIMINATE RAW MATERIAL INVENTORY ALTOGETHER; ELIMINATE INVENTORY ERRORS; HOW TO ELIMINATE THE INVENTORY ERRORS; ELIMINATE ERRORS BY PHYSICAL CYCLE COUNT; STANDARD AND AUXILIARY MATERIAL; EXTRA QUANTITY SIZE; ORDER POLICY; CONTROLLING ORDER SIZE; ECONOMIC ORDER QUANTITY - EOQ; RAW MATERIAL FOR INDEPENDENT ITEMS; RAW MATERIAL FOR DEPENDENT ITEMS; SUPPLIER CONTRACTS; CHAPTER 4 - WORK-IN-PROCESS IN LINE MANUFACTURING: INTRODUCTION; FLEXIBLE MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS - FMS; FLEXIBLE MANUFACTURING CELL - FMC; CHAPTER 4. CELLULAR MANUFACTURING AND GROUP TECHNOLOGY: GROUP TECHNOLOGY; CELLULAR MANUFACTURING; CHAPTER 5 - WIP IN BATCH TYPE MANUFACTURING: PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT CONTROLLING BATCH SIZE ; WORK IN PROCESS DURING PROCESSING ; SCHEDULING METHODS EFFECT; Common-sense manufacturing; Kanban system; Constant work in process - conwip; Cycle time management - CTM; SET UP REDUCTION TIME ; LEAD TIME REDUCTION; JOB RELEASE ; PART TWO: REDUCE COST OF PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT: CHAPTER 6 - COMPETITIVE MANAGEMENT : INTRODUCTION; CHAPTER 7 - PRODUCT SPECIFICATION:RE-EVALUATING PRODUCT SPECIFICATION; PRODUCT SPECIFICATION METHODS; CHAPTER 8 - PRODUCT DESIGN: INTRODUCTION; CHAPTER 9 - PROCESS PLANNING: INTRODUCTION; CHAPTER 10 - PRODUCTION PLANNING: INTRODUCTION; REQUIREMENT PLANNING; CAPACITY PLANNING; CHAPTER 11 - SHOP FLOOR CONTROL: INTRODUCTION; CHAPTER 12 - DECISION SUPPORT: INTRODUCTION; RESOURCE LEVEL OF COMPETITIVENESS; RESOURCE PLANNING; PART THREE APPEDIXES APPENDIX 1 : STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL: INTRODUCTION;
BASIC SPC TOOLS; PREREQUISITES FOR SPC - PROCESS CAPABILITY; CONTROL CHARTS; CONTROL CHART PARAMETERS SELECTION; INTERPRETING CONTROL CHART ANALYSIS; CAUSE AND EFFECT ANALYSIS - TROUBLESHOOTING; APPENDIX - 2:PRODUCTION PLANNING - EXAMPLE: INTRODUCTION; STOCK ALLOCATION; CAPACITY PLANNING - RESOURCE LOADING; RESOURCE LOADING FOR MINIMUM COST PROCESS PLAN; RESOURCE LOADING FOR MAXIMUM PRODUCTION PROCESS PLAN; RESOURCE LOADING - FLEXIBLE METHODS; INDEX.
The objectives of industrial management are: - Implementation of the policy adopted by the owners or the board of directors - Optimum return on investment - Efficient utilization of Men, Machine and Money. In other words, industry must make profit. Manufacturing represents only one aspect of the activities of industrial management. Present-day manufacturing methodology does not consider making profit as their primary objective. The manufacturing process requires the knowledge of many disciplines, such as design, process planning, costing, marketing, sales, customer relations, costing, purchasing, bookkeeping, inventory control, material handling, shipping, and so on. Each discipline considers the problem at hand from a different angle. For example, in the case of the introduction of a new product: - Marketing will evaluate its attractiveness to the customers -The product designer will evaluate methods of achieving product functions - The process planner will evaluate the required resources - Finance will evaluate the required investment - Manpower will consider the work force demands -The manufacturing engineer will consider floor space and material handling - Purchasing and shipping will consider how to store the product x Preface Each discipline optimizes its task to the best of its ability. Each manufacturing discipline has its own objectives and criteria of optimization according to its function. For example: the designer main objective is meeting product specifications; the process planner's main objective is that the items will meet drawing specifications; the production planner's main objectives are meeting the due date, and minimizing work-in-process.