The Reformed David(s) and the Question of Resistance to Tyranny: Reading the Bible in the 16th and 17th Centuries
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The Reformed David(s) and the Question of Resistance to Tyranny: Reading the Bible in the 16th and 17th Centuries

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ISBN-13:
9780567655486
Einband:
Buch
Erscheinungsdatum:
23.10.2014
Seiten:
248
Autor:
Nevada Levi Delapp
Gewicht:
539 g
Format:
241x159x27 mm
Serie:
601, Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Te
Sprache:
Englisch
Beschreibung:

This volume explores the function of the biblical figure of David in 16th and 17th century Reformed circles as a fluid model of political praxis capable of supporting theories of both resistance and non-resistance against a tyrant.
1. Introduction 2. Calvin and Beza Set the Stage 3. The Dutch David: William of Orange in Davidic Dress 4. Andrew Willet and the Jacobean David 5. Samuel Rutherford and the Scottish David 6. The David Story: Gap-Filling and Reading Strategies 7. Bibliography
This study centers on the question: how do particular readers read a biblical passage? What factors govern each reading? DeLapp here attempts to set up a test case for observing how both socio-historical and textual factors play a part in how a person reads a biblical text. Using a reception-historical methodology, he surveys five Reformed authors and their readings of the David and Saul story (primarily 1 Sam 24 and 26). From this survey two interrelated phenomena emerge. First, all the authors find in David an ideal model for civic praxis-a "Davidic social imaginary" (Charles Taylor). Second, despite this primary agreement, the authors display two different reading trajectories when discussing David's relationship with Saul. Some read the story as showing a persecuted exile, who refuses to offer active resistance against a tyrannical monarch. Others read the story as exemplifying active defensive resistance against a tyrant. To account for this convergence and divergence in the readings, DeLapp argues for a two-fold conclusion. The authors are influenced both by their socio-historical contexts and by the shape of the biblical text itself.
Given a Deuteronomic frame conducive to the social imaginary, the paradigmatic narratives of 1 Sam 24 and 26 offer a narrative gap never resolved. The story never makes explicit to the reader what David is doing in the wilderness in relation to King Saul. As a result, the authors fill in the "gap" in ways that accord with their own socio-historical experiences.