Globalization and the International Financial System: What's Wrong and What Can Be Done
-5 %

Globalization and the International Financial System: What's Wrong and What Can Be Done

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ISBN-13:
9780521843898
Einband:
Buch
Erscheinungsdatum:
01.11.2006
Seiten:
388
Autor:
Peter Isard
Gewicht:
626 g
Format:
236x167x26 mm
Sprache:
Englisch
Beschreibung:

This book discusses the problematic side of the international financial system.
List of figures, tables and boxes; List of abbreviations; Acknowledgments and disclaimer; Part I. Background: 1. Introduction; 2. The evolution of the international monetary system; 3. The international monetary fund; Part II. International Financial Crises and Obstacles to Growth: 4. Factors contributing to international financial crises; 5. The effects of crises and controversies over how to respond; 6. Perspectives on economic growth and poverty reduction; Part III. The Agenda for Reform: 7. What can individual countries do?; 8. How can the international financial system be reformed?; References; Author index; Subject index.
Economic globalization has given rise to frequent and severe financial crises in emerging market economies. Other countries are also unsuccessful in their efforts to generate economic growth and reduce poverty. This book provides perspectives on various aspects of the international financial system that contribute to financial crises and growth failures, and discusses the remedies that economists have proposed for addressing the underlying problems. It also sheds light on a central feature of the international financial system that remains mysterious to many economists and most non-economists: the activities of the International Monetary Fund and the factors that influence its effectiveness. Dr Isard offers policy perspectives on what countries can do to reduce their vulnerabilities to financial crises and growth failures, and a number of general directions for systemic reform. The breadth of the agenda provides grounds for optimism that the international financial system can be strengthened considerably without revolutionary change.